Rules for Stroke of Luck Putting Card Game

A great game for country clubs, bars & taverns, or any charitable fundraising event. We have found that Stroke of Luck players prefer to use their own putters & golf balls. Players (or club management) determine the rules for the game. Significant flexibility can be introduced into any game via agreed-upon rules, “putt again situations,” and/or “wild card” consequences or benefits.

Official Rules & Game Play

Inviolable

  • If more that one of an individual player’s putts land on the same card, only the first card counts toward that player’s hand.
  • If a putt hits one of your earlier balls putted, we recommend the player putts again. You may want to consider marking previously putted cards, using a coin or marker. You may also play a stymie game where opponents’ putted balls remain on the playing card grid.
  • The player must putt his/her ball into play (the card grid/matrix). If a putt is off the grid or onto the same card, the player loses that card (alternative suggestions: putt again or fold; players choose!).

Suggested

  • We recommend a few practice putts to get a “feel” for the green.
  • Players decide the ante (buy-in), same as any poker game of chance.
  • To determine who goes first, players roll the die. Highest roll goes first. Roll again if tied.
  • Each player rolls the die to determine which position they will putt from (1 thru 6 “tee” positions) for the entire hand.
  • Your hand is the best of 5 or 7 cards, with which you can play 5-card draw or 7-card stud. Players have also played Texas Hold’em, but need a dealer/judge to determine final decisions.
  • Players will determine if a player putts all 5-7 cards at once, or if they putt once, and then rotate between all players.
  • 4 wild cards are positioned on the mat. Players determine if wild cards are used as traditional jokers, or if some are chosen to represent “fold,” “out of bounds” or “putt again.”
  • Due to our exclusive No Line Judge™ technology a ball will rarely land squarely on a line, but in the event it does and players cannot agree on the lie, the play is referred to a dealer, judge, or innocent bystander for a decision. Player may also be allowed to simply putt again.